Twixt with a physical set
 
AuthorMessage
Peyrol
25 Jun 2016 11:20 AM
This is a continuation of a debate that started in the chat window. We were discussing the merits of various features different Twixt servers have to offer. Kalash said:
[quote]Playing twixt on a board you dont have visible lines, no analysis, no letters and you cannot confirm your move. Moved is moved.[/quote]
"Visible lines" means diagonal guide lines. Here is a set of mine which I added the lines to:
https://cf.geekdo-images.com/images/pic268974_lg.jpg
Of course no commercial set that I know of is sold with such lines, unless you count the Felsberger set which has channels on the board for every possible link.
The Kosmos set has coordinate labels. Likely other European sets do as well. Like guide lines, they can be added if desired.
https://cf.geekdo-images.com/images/pic25712.jpg
I tend to agree that conveniences such as automatic linking and an analysis board one click away tend to spoil us against the experience of playing face to face. They make us lazy. But picking up a peg and putting it into a hole is a much slower and more deliberate process than clicking on a hole with a mouse. It's much easier to mis-click on a screen. Also, whether your opponent will allow take back or not would depend on the circumstances, would it not?

So I must ask you, Kalash, what point were you making? That Internet players should keep in mind the physical reality which is being simulated? I completely agree. But we were chatting about the merits of these features on various servers. For me, implementing the pie rule is probably most important.
scooter1101980
26 Jun 2016 12:29 AM
I also have altered my playing boards. Helplines are added, #'s and letters marked on the border. It helps, many of us will never play games head to head anymore on a game board. The people are just not there. I will introduce grandkids to the game via the board, but other than that, I see no use of the board game. Sad, but to a lot of players, I imagine the board holds many good memories, so never let the board game itself, die. The game has evolved from the board game. Alan Hensel created that twixt commentator, and championship players use it. It's there for a reason, use it, appreciate it, and love the game.
 
 
 
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